Further coats of Milk Paint/Instagram

Those following my series of posts on milk paint may remember that back in January we painted the first coat of paint on the Continuous Arm Rocker. Paint makes surface defects much more apparent, so let’s look and see what we can find:

SAM_0865

A couple drops of paint on the seat need to be sanded down, along with some raised grain.  I like the growth rings to pop (one kind of raised grain), but narrow raised fibers can become white streaks when you rub through the paint layers during the rubbing-down process (more info in further posts).

SAM_0868

Lots of raised grain on the arm where I rasped, scraped and sanded it smooth.  This is will happen anywhere you rasp, scrape or sand, especially on radial surfaces like this one.

SAM_0870

Sanding it with 220 will fix thatSAM_0872

A hole around a spindle tenon that I missed, plus a tool mark on the side of the arm (below and to right of tenon) that I don’t like.

SAM_0874

Putty and sanding fixed the hole, scraping and sanding fixed the mark

SAM_0876

Excess paint in the v-groove forms a crust layer that flakes off easily.  Sand that off with 220.SAM_0878

My bevel on the end of the arm is rather wiggly.  Now’s the time to fix that with a spokeshave. SAM_0895

Dern, I picked up the chair with oil on my hands.

SAM_0888

If you paint over the oil the paint pulls away from the oil, leaving funny red spots.

SAM_0898

I’ve never had this problem before. Like any good woodworker, I went to IdiotsFixingChairs.com and learned that household vinegar should remove the oil.  It worked wonders.


Instagram

As the last human on earth without a cell phone, I am amazed  to report that I am now on Instagram.  If you want to see photos of what I’m working on once or twice a week, ‘follow’ me there. No cell phone required.

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Posted in Finishing, How-To

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