FRENCH SPOON CARVING with JANE MICKELBOROUGH & ELIA BIZZARRI

FRENCH SPOON CARVING with JANE MICKELBOROUGH & ELIA BIZZARRI

Part 1

We split the blank from a maple log and carve it with drawknife and shave horse, knife and gouge. Jane has developed a carving process that allows the blank to be easily held in a conventional shaving horse. She also demonstrates using a paroir de sabotier (clog-maker’s knife) to carve a spoon. Class length, ~2 hours. Q&A included. $20 suggested.

Tool List for Part 1:
Hatchet
Mallet
Drawknife
Vise or Shave-horse
Saw
Pencil, ruler, eraser

Part 2:

After the final shaping of the spoon blank, Jane shows us a variety of chip carving techniques. Then we fill the carvings with wax inlay, just like the traditional French spoon carvers. Class length, ~2 hours. Q&A included. $20 suggested.

Tool List for Part 2:
Straight and curved knife for finishing
Small cabinet scrapers
Chip carving knife
Pencil, ruler, eraser

 

I am fascinated by wooden spoons–what appear to be simple, everyday objects are, in fact, very subtle three-dimensional shapes. Ten years ago I discovered the tradition of spoon carving here in Brittany, NW France, where I live.

Back in the 18th – 19th centuries these beautiful boxwood spoons were made to be taken to religious festivals and to weddings. Everyone had to take their own spoon and knife. This seems to have evolved into “who’s got the best spoon?”

While these spoons were fairly simple shapes, the handles were richly decorated with metal and wax inlays. It’s this shape of spoon we make in these two classes.

LIVE CLASSES

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RECORDED VIDEOS

Full 2-hour recordings of the live-streamed online classes:

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“That spoon carving video blew me away. You all need a TV show. I love the format, it worked really, really well I believe. There were good closeups and I liked how Curtis was watching the work and visible right there. It was quite meta.”
– Adam Tracy

A lot of tech: Four video cameras, a micro video camera, ATEM mini pro video switch, OBS broadcasting software, production lighting. Ian Strickland & John Parkinson, videographers; Roy Underhill, part-time videographer; Seth Elliott, moderator

GREENWOOD VIDEO EXCERPTS

Contolling a Split with a Froe

Choosing Splitting Wedges

Attaching a Froe Handle

SPOON CARVING with CURTIS BUCHANAN EXCERPTS

Steam Bending a Spoon Blank

Using a Drawknife to Carve a Spoon

A Hollow-Grinding Jig for Sloyd Knives